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How was Western Europe affected by ww2?

How was Western Europe affected by ww2?

In addition, many cities, towns and villages across Europe were completely destroyed by aerial bombing and heavy artillery. The wanton destruction of homes created thousands of refugees and displaced persons. Almost everyone in Europe was affected by the war.

What problems did Germany face after ww2?

Most of Germany’s institutions had crumbled, and its populace was on the brink of starvation. The Allies exacted reparations for World War II, too. They weren’t paid in actual money, but through industrial dismantling, the removal of intellectual property and forced labor for millions of German POWs.

What was the aftermath of World War 2?

Post-War: Chaos and Challenges. After the German surrender in May 1945, World War II ended in Europe. Its most immediate legacies were death, devastation, and misery. The scale and speed of the conflict had been unprecedented: the war ended up killing at least 19 million non-combatant civilians in Europe.

How did people survive in Europe after World War 2?

Many Europeans were surviving on less than 1,000 calories per day; in the Netherlands they were eating tulip bulbs. Apart from the United States and allies such as Canada and Australia, who were largely unscathed by the war’s destruction, the European powers such as Britain and France had precious little to spare.

How did World War 2 affect people’s lives?

In this paper, we investigate long-run effects of World War II on late-life economic and health outcomes in Western continental Europe (health, education, labor market outcomes and marriage). We explore several channels through which this war might have influenced individual lives, and document which groups of the population were most affected.

How did the Allies rebuild the world after World War 2?

The allies did what they could to feed and house the refugees and to reunite families that had been forcibly torn apart, but the scale of the task and the obstacles were enormous. The majority of ports in Europe and many in Asia had been destroyed or badly damaged; bridges had been blown up; railway locomotives and rolling stock had vanished.